Market on Wheels Ideas

Here are what ideas I have so far about what we should do/need to look into for the Market on Wheels:

  • According to the Arcadia Mobile Food Market 1st Year Report a “Food Desert” is an area that is defined as a low-income census tract and does not have ready access to supermarkets or grocery stores. (Arcadia 5) We need to find out where the Food Deserts are around this area. I know that there is an area in Collinsville which is most likely a Food Desert (no places to buy food except one convenience store and a low-income population.) but outside of that I have no idea where they might be.
  • We need to find out where in the Food Deserts the Market on Wheels can and should stop. Schools, churches, parks, and Senior Centers are all recommended location types. (Arcadia 10)
  • We need to look at what would need to outfit the Market that could be stored in whatever vehicle we end up with; this would include something to keep stuff cold, some displays (baskets, shelves, and milk crates would all work.) The annual reports would be an excellent place to get ideas from.
  • We need to assess how many containers we need vs. how many we have. Also, we need to look at if we want/need. (I find the difference between want and need is often how much money is left) any other types of containers, such as raised beds like Claire mentioned in her post, here, or for plants that require more root space, something like the potato tower talked about on the Gateway Greening Blog.
  • Clare mentioned on her blog, here, that we might need something that would provide shade for plants that need it. We could look into a 45-degree trellis. This would give shade as well as more growing space. However, it would take good timing to make it work. (Gateway Greening)
  • Plants! What plants will grow on a roof? Root vegetables and leafy greens are supposed to work well. (Heirloom Organics) What else works? What produce do people want/need? What plants should we put next to each other? Plants do not naturally grow alone so planting certain one together can be beneficial. I know that planting basil (or any of its relatives) near and with tomatoes can keep away pests. Are there any more such pairings we can exploit?
  • When to plant the plants? I know Luz mentions in her blog, here, a lot of ideas about figuring out what to plant when and the possibility of starting plants indoors. I would like to add on what she has/suggest for the starting indoors that we start seeds in a lightbox. These are easy to make (the one I use for work is just plywood, aluminum foil, and a light bulb.) and can be whatever size we need. After the seeds have sprouted and have gotten big enough, we can plant them into to a greenhouse (if we have access to one). From there we can put them into the ground. This is the method we use at Willoughby, and it gets some of the highest plants per amount of seeds.

Areas, if would like to help with, are:

Researching plants that work well together. I hate monocultures; they are too separate and are not the best way to grow plants. There is research showing that growing plants together can increase yields and reduce pests without pesticides and GMOs (two other things I hate). I would like to look into what we could do along these lines.

Manual labor also I always find enjoyable. I love getting my hands dirty.

I am willing and able to do any work needed for this project.

Here are my citeations which I forgot to add last time:

Rick Obst. Ambrosia Farm Produce Stand (28066608710).

Wikimedia Commons, 15 July 2016, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ambrosia_Farm_Produce_Stand_(28066608710).jpg. Accessed 15 January 2018

Arcadia Center for Sustainable Food & Agriculture, Mobile Market: Applying the Food Truck Model to Food

 Access. http://arcadiafood.org, Arcadia Center for Sustainable Food & Agriculture, 2013, http://arcadiafood.org/sites/default/files/files/arcadia%20%20mobile%20market%20report%20Digital.pdf.>

Gateway Greening. Experiments in the Demonstration Garden: Potato Towers. Gateway Greening Blog,

5 December 2017, http://www.gatewaygreening.org/potato-tower-experiment/.

Gateway Greening. Experiments in the Demonstration Garden: 45 Degree Trellis. Gateway Greening Blog, 5 December 2017, http://www.gatewaygreening.org/45-degree-trellis/

Heirloom Organics. Rooftop Vegetable Gardening Guide. Heirloom-organics.com, http://www.heirloom-organics.com/guide/ug/rooftopvegetablegardeningguide.html.

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One Comment Add yours

  1. sshouldis says:

    I like the idea of stopping at schools and churches, one of the ideas flourished by the food truck is establishing and further connecting a community.

    Liked by 1 person

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